‘Peloton husband’ gets real-life girlfriend a Peloton for Christmas

What else did she expect?

The actor who played the husband in the infamous Peloton bike commercial got his real-life girlfriend a not so surprising Christmas present. Hopefully, his girlfriend’s year with the bike goes better than his on-screen wife’s did.

Actor Sean Hunter shared an image of his girlfriend with their new Peloton bike on Instagram (his account is appropriately named Pelotonhusband). The photo is captioned, “Here’s hoping this goes over better the second time… Merry Christmas to my actual girlfriend (please don’t leave me).”

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Hunter’s post references the backlash to a commercial he starred in earlier this year for the bike company. In the ad, a husband gives his wife a Peloton bike for Christmas. She then spends the next year chronicling her use of the bike, which she initially seems excited about but shows hesitation using throughout the year.

By the commercial’s end, she’s used the bike for an entire year and says that it’s changed her.

The commercial went viral, but not for the reasons Peloton was hoping, however. It was mocked online, with the husband being called “abusive” and “a symbol of the patriarchy.”

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Hunter, an actor and elementary school teacher in Vancouver, Canada, wrote a long response to Psychology Today about his experience with the commercial, which he shot in September, claiming when the clip was first posted, it was “well-received.”

“A few comments from my friends came in and the overall consensus was that it was awesome, one even mentioning, ‘I always knew you would make the big time.’ I appreciated the compliments, but in my eyes, it was just a small role. I was simply grateful for the experience.”

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However, the positive reception was short-lived when the video went viral, he says, and now he fears it will haunt him for the rest of his career.

“I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. My 5 seconds of air time created an array of malicious feedback that is all associated with my face,” he said in the Psychology Today essay.

Fox News’ Alexandra Deabler contributed to this report.