Is one workout better than multiple, shorter workouts while you’re stuck at home?

Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. Sign up here.

With more people working from home, and plenty of gyms across the country remaining closed, home workouts are becoming more popular. Some may be exercising simply to just pass the time during quarantine, but others might be more interested in the quality of their sweat sessions, wondering if it’s a good idea to exercise once-a-day or to spread shorter workouts throughout the day.

While several smaller workouts throughout the day, or ones utilizing varying degrees of intensity can be beneficial, they aren’t as easy as they look.
(iStock)

“When you work out, essentially you are putting your body under stress so it can rebuild itself,” personal trainer Marvin Toney told Fox News. “If you are a beginner, or the average person who works out to stay in shape, one workout will suffice. The reason for this is that you will become sore and will need to rest. Also, eat a clean diet and have a committed mindset to maximize results —- that, in itself, is a job that will keep you busy.”

Training more frequently throughout the day can have its benefits, though. According to Toney, multiple sessions will stimulate muscle growth in more ways, ”resulting in a more conditioned and toned look overall. This is the kind of aesthetic you see in fitness magazines. It also allows you to experiment with various training methods you wouldn’t otherwise have been able to incorporate into a normal workout.”

REGULAR EXERCISE CAN HELP PREVENT CORONAVIRUS COMPLICATIONS FROM WORSENING, STUDY FINDS

Although this method sounds great, “it’s not without some sacrifices,” Toney says. Aside from the increased demands on your stamina and requiring a higher level of discipline, it also puts more stress on the body.

“Your body will be more stressed from the training and burning more calories. You will need to replace those calories, and eat a balanced diet to ensure that you are supplementing the increased training regimen,” he said. “In addition, you will need to stay hydrated and replace electrolytes that are lost during your workout throughout the day.”

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

This type of training has some similarities with high-intensity interval training, and a Swedish type of workout known as “Fartlek.” While both involve varying the intensity of a workout over a period of time, interval training is regimented while Fartlek is more varied.

“In terms of Fartlek training or training intervals, you should have the same mindset as training several times a day,” Toney explained. “You will need to gain some conditioning in order to have an effective workout. One of the things to keep in mind is with these types of workouts, the chance of injury is higher, so you should have some background in training or be comfortable ‘pushing’ your body to gain advantages in endurance.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Interval training, however, is a good way to gain endurance, speed, and increase cardiovascular health,” Toney continued. “You should be comfortable working out and doing it constantly before attempting this style of training.

“Remember, looking at someone doing it, and actually doing it in person, are two different things.”